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5 Deep Sea Mining Environmental Impacts

5 Deep Sea Mining Environmental Impacts

Deep-sea mining risks marine biodiversity and further climate change, highlighting the urge for further research to understand potential impacts better and develop effective regulations.

The world’s transition towards green energy is driving a surge in demand for rare earth metals, leading mining companies to explore the deep-sea for supplies.


However, the potential environmental impacts of deep-sea mining are causing heated debate among environmentalists and scientists as a Canadian company prepares to launch the first-ever commercial deep-sea mining operations in the Pacific Ocean.


Many are calling for a delay in approval to allow for extensive research and the development of regulations. Here we highlight the possible cost of the green energy revolution and the impact of deep-sea mining on the environment.


Deep-sea environmental impacts


  • Deep-sea mining destroys habitats and threatens various species that live in the sea beds.

  • Deep-sea mining can cause marine and chemical pollution due to sediments dumped into the oceans, e.g., oil spills, which devastate marine diversity. 

  • It can cause biodiversity loss as mining disrupts the marine ecosystem's sensitivity.

  • Deep-sea mining leads to reduced water quality in the surroundings. This mining can generate plumes of sediment and waste that can drift away from mining sites and negatively impact water quality, causing health problems to marine organisms.

  • It can contribute to climate change when greenhouse gases are released during mining, disrupting the natural process that helps regulate the earth’s climate.

To address the negative impacts of deep-sea mining on the environment, regenerative business practices can be adopted, such as using environmentally friendly mining techniques and implementing proper waste management.  Additionally, efforts can be made to reduce the demand for rare earth metals by promoting recycling and innovation in manufacturing renewable technologies.


This can assist in addressing the battery mineral shortage and reduce the need for deep-sea mining. Governments can strengthen deep-sea mining regulations to ensure the process is environmentally sustainable.


Deep-sea mining risks marine biodiversity and further climate change, highlighting the urge for further research to understand potential impacts better and develop effective regulations. Good practices can result in a NET POSITIVE for the environment and future generations.

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